The Moral Crimes Of The IRS And Their Punishments

The recent scandal concerning the discrimination of the Internal Revenue Service against conservative non-profit organizations has brought discussion of the integrity of the IRS into the establishment media discourse. But while the establishment media is quite willing to discuss the various aspects of the current scandal, they are not discussing the morality of the regular activities and functions of the IRS. Let us look at the definition of several crimes, see how taxation relates to them, and see what punishments would be inflicted upon any private citizen who acted in the same manner as the IRS. The definitions and punishments come from the United States Code.

Robbery: According to the United States Code, Title 18, Part I, Chapter 103, Section 2111, whoever, within the special maritime and territorial jurisdiction of the United States, by force and violence, or by intimidation, takes or attempts to take from the person or presence of another anything of value, shall be imprisoned not more than 15 years.
How taxation relates: If a person disagrees with the tax policies of the government and acts upon that disagreement by refusing to pay, then the state will initiate force against that person. If the delinquency persists, then agents of the state within the special maritime and territorial jurisdiction of the United States, by force and violence, or by intimidation, will take or attempt to take from the person or presence of the tax resister something of value as a lien on the tax “debt.” Therefore if anyone else did what the IRS does, they would be guilty of robbery.

Slavery: According to the United States Code, Title 18, Part I, Chapter 77, Section 1589, whoever knowingly provides or obtains the labor or services of a person by any one of, or by any combination of, the following means— (1) by means of force, threats of force, physical restraint, or threats of physical restraint to that person or another person; (2) by means of serious harm or threats of serious harm to that person or another person; (3) by means of the abuse or threatened abuse of law or legal process; or (4) by means of any scheme, plan, or pattern intended to cause the person to believe that, if that person did not perform such labor or services, that person or another person would suffer serious harm or physical restraint, shall be fined under this title, imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both. Also, whoever knowingly benefits, financially or by receiving anything of value, from participation in a venture which has engaged in the providing or obtaining of labor or services by any of the means described above, knowing or in reckless disregard of the fact that the venture has engaged in the providing or obtaining of labor or services by any of such means, shall be fined under this title, imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both. If death results from a violation of this section, or if the violation includes kidnapping, an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, the defendant shall be fined under this title, imprisoned for any term of years or life, or both.
How taxation relates: Forcible taxation on one’s personal income makes one a slave because the state is knowingly providing or obtaining the labor or services of a person by means of force, threats of force, physical restraint, or threats of physical restraint to that person or another person. As IRS agents receive their salaries from tax revenue, they knowingly benefit, financially or by receiving anything of value, from participation in a venture which has engaged in the providing or obtaining of labor or services by any of the means described above, knowing or in reckless disregard of the fact that the venture has engaged in the providing or obtaining of labor or services by any of such means. Therefore if anyone else did what the IRS does, they would be guilty of two counts of slavery.

Receipt of stolen monies: According to the United States Code, Title 18, Part I, Chapter 113, Section 2315, receives, possesses, conceals, stores, barters, sells, or disposes of any goods, wares, or merchandise, securities, or money of the value of $5,000 or more, which have crossed a State or United States boundary after being stolen, unlawfully converted, or taken, knowing the same to have been stolen, unlawfully converted, or taken, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 10 years, or both.
How taxation relates: The conduct of the IRS in collecting taxes meets the definition of robbery, therefore the tax money is stolen. The IRS receives and possesses the money which has crossed a State or United States boundary after being stolen, and taxes are frequently levied in amounts exceeding $5,000. Therefore if anyone else did what the IRS does, they would be guilty of receipt of stolen monies.

Transportation of stolen monies: According to the United States Code, Title 18, Part I, Chapter 113, Section 2314, whoever transports, transmits, or transfers in interstate or foreign commerce any goods, wares, merchandise, securities or money, of the value of $5,000 or more, knowing the same to have been stolen, converted or taken by fraud, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 10 years, or both.
How taxation relates: The conduct of the IRS in collecting taxes meets the definition of robbery, therefore the tax money is stolen. The IRS transmits the money across state lines, and taxes are frequently levied in amounts exceeding $5,000. Therefore if anyone else did what the IRS does, they would be guilty of transportation of stolen monies.

Conspiracy: According to the United States Code, Title 18, Part I, Chapter 19, Section 373, whoever, with intent that another person engage in conduct constituting a felony that has as an element the use, attempted use, or threatened use of physical force against property or against the person of another in violation of the laws of the United States, and under circumstances strongly corroborative of that intent, solicits, commands, induces, or otherwise endeavors to persuade such other person to engage in such conduct, shall be imprisoned not more than one-half the maximum term of imprisonment or (notwithstanding United States Code, Title 18, Part II, Chapter 227, Subchapter C, Section 3571) fined not more than one-half of the maximum fine prescribed for the punishment of the crime solicited, or both; or if the crime solicited is punishable by life imprisonment or death, shall be imprisoned for not more than 20 years.
How taxation relates: IRS agents work together to enforce tax laws. As any other group of people who worked together to do what the IRS does would be engaging in conduct that has as an element the use, attempted use, or threatened use of physical force against property or against the person of another in violation of the laws of the United States, and under circumstances strongly corroborative of that intent, solicits, commands, induces, or otherwise endeavors to persuade such other person to engage in such conduct, they would be guilty of conspiracy to commit those crimes.

When we add up the above sentences, we get that any private citizen who acted in the same manner as an IRS agent would be looking at a maximum prison term of (15+20+20+10+10)*1.5=112.5 years, as well as a fine of up to $250,000*4*1.5=$1,500,000. So when the day that the rule of the state is abolished, the agents of the state are denied their claimed moral exceptions, and government is suppressed as a criminal enterprise comes, a sentence of up to 112.5 years imprisonment and a fine of up to $1,500,000 for carrying out the functions of the IRS would be in keeping with the principle that one should be judged by the same standards that one judges.

Notes: This analysis only accounts for the minimum acts involved in taxation, and may not be exhaustive in doing so. An arrest and imprisonment for evading taxes, for example, would add additional charges, as this would be kidnapping if a private citizen engaged in such activity.

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